Cultivars We Grow

APPLES

University of Saskatchewan Research Program Varieties

Prairie Sensation

Large, firm, crisp and juicy. Intense aroma. Similar to the gala apple. Great for fresh eating, juicing and cooking. Stores for four months under proper condition. Ripens mid-September.

Prairie Sun

Crisp, moderately sweet and resistant to oxidation browning. Good for fresh eating and makes excellent processed products. Stores well for approximately 6 weeks. Ripens early September.

Misty Rose

Medium, firm, sweet and juicy. Colour is 90% red wash over light green. Very good eaten fresh. The fruit has good storability. Ripens early September.

Granny Annie

Medium to large. The flavour is good and sub-acid (like a good Granny Smith both sweet and sour). Excellent eating for people who like tart apples. Ripens late early October.

Autumn Delight

Small to medium, very sweet, bright red. I call it “the lunch box apple.” Excellent storability, ripens late September.

Petrofka Mac

Large, sweet with bitter after taste. It is a Macintosh/Brockland seedling. It is hardy at my place and tastes like a good Macintosh. It has good storability, good juicer. Ripens mid-September.

Red Mike

Small, Mac aroma, red in colour, good storage. Ripens in mid September.

Patience

Medium in size, bright red colour, good dessert apple, good cooking apple. Good selling apple over the counter. Stores well and ripens late September.

Some of the Old Favorite Varieties

Norland

Medium sweet apple, good for fresh eating and cooking. Ripens mid-August, store for two months if picked before maturity.

Parkland

Medium to large, good for fresh eating and cooking. Ripens late August. Hardy and resistant to fire blight. Good storage ability.

Battleford

A proven apple for many years. Medium to large, good fresh eating and juicing. Fair cooking. A top rated prairie apple tree for hardiness. Ripens in late August.

Goodland

Large, sweet and slightly acidic. Very good for fresh eating and cooking. Should be in sheltered location, store two to three months. Ripens late September.

Minnesota 447

Now named “Frost Bite” medium, very firm, sweet and crisp. Excellent juicer, fresh eating. Under proper condition will store for six months or more. Ripens in mid October.

Rescue

A small crab apple. Flesh is white, crisp and sweet. Good for canning and juicing. Does not store well. Very hardy to the Prairie, ripens in August.

Norda

Medium to large, crisp and moderately juicy. Good for fresh eating and cooking. Some say Norda is the same apple as Norkent. Ripens early September, moderately thick skin. Very hardy to our climate.

Dwarf Sour Cherries

SK Carmine Jewel

Carmine Jewel Cherry is a hardy deciduous shrub and hybrid variety of the University of Saskatchewan Sour Cherry. It produces dark, black cherries with small pits that are good for pies and wine making. The hardiest of the dwarf sour cherry varieties, Carmine Jewel Cherry is a beautiful accent or landscape/orchard tree.  Carmine Jewel is often the first cherry ready in the summer.

Romeo

Romeo Cherry is a hardy deciduous hybrid shrub variety of Sour Cherry released in the Romance Series of dwarf sour cherries from the University of Saskatchewan in 2004. It features dark red/black, flavourful fruit most suitable for fresh eating, processing, and juice production. Romeo Cherry is also suitable as an accent or landscape tree.

Juliet

Juliet Cherry is a hardy deciduous shrub and hybrid variety of the University of Saskatchewan Sour Cherry released in the Romance Series of dwarf sour cherries in 2004. It blooms earlier than the other Romance varieties, and produces highly desirable, delicious dark red fruit for production with high yields. Juliet Cherry is ideal as a landscape or accent tree.

Cupid

Cherry is a hardy deciduous hybrid shrub variety of Sour Cherry released in the Romance Series of dwarf sour cherries from the University of Saskatchewan in 2004. Cupid Cherry produces the largest fruit of all the sour cherries which is dark/red fruit and perfect for fresh eating, but it tends to be a bit later than other varieties.

Haskaps (honey berry)

Aurora

Aurora Haskap produces great tasting berries. Their taste is a cross between raspberry and blueberry. Aurora is a pollinator variety that causes other varieties to have a higher yield when planted together.

Tundra

Tundra Haskap is a hardy deciduous shrub. Of all the varieties, Tundra has the firmest fruit, making it great for commercial production. Tundra does not self-pollinate well. We recommend another variety, such as Honeybee or Aurora, be planted at a minimum 1:8 ratio with it to boost fruit production.

Indigo Gem

Indigo Gem has fruit similar in size and firmness to the Tundra variety, making it suitable for commercial production or your home garden.   Indigo Gem does not self-pollinate well. We recommend another variety, such as Honeybee or Aurora, be planted at a minimum 1:8 ratio with it to boost fruit production.

Honey Bee

Honey Bee Haskap is a hardy deciduous shrub. Honey Bee Haskap produces tarter fruit than the Borealis and Tundra varieties, and it holds its fruit longer. This Haskap’s leaves are sunburn and powdery mildew resistant. Honey Bee Haskap makes a great pollinator for Borealis, Tundra or the Indigo varieties.

Cultivar

Berry Size

Flavour

Bush Size

Other

Aurora 2.17 grams sweet large Fast growing, new release, UofS
Tundra 1.49 grams sweet/tart average Firm fruit, UofS
Indigo Gem 1.30 grams sweet/tangy average Slightly chewy texture, UofS
Honeybee 1.9 grams tart large Hangs onto its fruit, UofS

APPLES HASKAPS DWARF SOUR CHERRIES

Fresh to the Core